China, the world’s second-largest economy with an estimated GDP of 14.5 trillion dollars, is one of the first places foreign investors look when considering expanding their enterprise. With low-cost labor, a substantial domestic market (given its enormous population), and strategic geographical location, China is a global economic powerhouse with an unparalleled manufacturing sector. Read more about Payroll Compliance in China.

Read More

Singapore has a well-developed market, skilled workforce, and a robust corporate infrastructure that makes it an excellent place to expand your business. According to the World Bank, Singapore is the second easiest nation in which to conduct business (after New Zealand).

The business climate of Singapore has its foundation set in globalization, focusing on the principles of quality, reliability, productivity, and integrity. It is vital to gain basic knowledge of the local laws and regulations if you wish to form a company in Singapore. Here is a breakdown of the country’s corporate compliance requirements and the challenges associated with them:

Read More

In Vietnam, there are many factors to consider when hiring employees. Background checks, terms of employment, minimum wage, laws on discrimination, and harassment are just a few of the considerations. Employment relationships are currently regulated using the 2012 Labor Code but will be supplanted by a new code coming into effect on 1st January 2021. Learn more about Employment Benefits in Vietnam.

Read More

The Labor Code of Ukraine is a legislative act that polices employment labor regulations in Ukraine. However, various provisions are made more explicit in the subordinate legislative regulations. These include work conditions, wages, leave policies, and other privileges that are usually decided by collective bargaining agreements.

Read More

In Uzbekistan, employment relations are overseen by statutory legislation or by collective agreements. The law in Uzbekistan takes into account the concerns and interests of workers, employers, and the state. It ensures that the labor market is kept functioning, the working conditions in Uzbekistan are just and safe, and the rights of workers are protected at all costs. All these factors come together to ensure productivity, ensure quality work, and help raise the standard of living.

Read More

In Uganda, fair treatment includes treating all employees with respect, giving them their rights, and following a proper code of conduct. Employees’ right to privacy must be protected, and feedback must be given to ensure that they meet their maximum potential at their jobs. The country has incorporated several Uganda Fair Treatment Workplace Laws to ensure their workers are protected.

Read More

Ever since the spread of coronavirus in Canada, more than two million workers have lost their jobs. There have been severe effects on unemployment, hours, and wages. This means that the labor market is struggling to make ends meet, and industries are experiencing significant changes, especially in the outcome of the Canadian economy. Read more about the COVID impact on the Canadian Labor Market.

Read More

2020 certainly turned the world upside down and forced organizations to make significant changes to their operations. In recent conversations with my clients, I’ve seen both sides of the spectrum. Some have scaled back operations, while others embraced expansion as employees worked entirely remote. Global Expansion in 2021 will been different, but is still possible.

Read More